Why am I doing FIRE?

I am in my mid-thirties. I didn’t really think much about the future when I was in my twenties and I think my interest in FIRE is part of a realisation that life is rather short and there is a limited time to do what you want. Of course, I thought of the future, but it was perhaps a fantasy future which was what we were taught to aspire to, rather than the reality.

I have led a fairly interesting life and have experienced things that the majority of people my age may not have (marriage, divorce, living overseas, loss of a parent). I have also had some extremely positive things happen to me such as returning to university to follow my dream of becoming a barrister (that is an ongoing dream!).

By stopping work for a year, I stepped off the treadmill that so many people my age are on. That feeling of constant pressure to get to the next stage of life. The route set out for us which is seen as a success (school, university, job, marriage, house, car, kids… then what? slow death?).

I was blown off course by becoming divorced at age 30. I won’t dwell on that, but at the time, it felt like a massive step backwards in what had until that point, been a life that felt like I was boosting forwards. I was depressed for some time, but as they say, it made me stronger and a better more compassionate person.

I think realising that taking a step backwards wasn’t the worst thing that could happen was a real eye-opener for me. I realised that I could recover from it, and come back stronger. I also believe it gave me the confidence to take action and pursue an alternative career at a later stage in life.

More recently, finding out about FIRE, which is essentially a movement that encourages people to minimise expenses and live frugally, was appealing as I had given up a well-paid job to return to University.  I had no money and had become used to living the frugal life. When I got a job, I thought, what if I keep living this way? I have kept things under check and found that I am not missing out at all. Most of my friends these days have bought houses and are mortgaged to the hilt with kids in tow.

In the past, I would be eating out 5 times a week, going to the pub and spending £50 a time 2-3 times a week. Did I have an alcohol problem? I may have, but if I did, I don’t now.

I have a mortgage, but no kids, and feel my salary is more than ample to live off. I don’t eat out that much anymore. I don’t eat takeaways. I learned to cook and eat reasonably healthily. I go to the pub and drink moderately. All these subtle changes have reduced spending compared to what I shall call ‘pre-university’.

So I am not doing a full FIRE thing yet, but I am attempting to follow its philosophy. The basics of minimising spending and saving as much as possible are no-brainers.

I’m at the beginning of the journey, but find it has given me a more disciplined outlook. I am looking forward to paying off my debts, followed by building up savings and investments. That is the way forwards!

 

 

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