May update

May has been a long month by all measures. Many things have come to a head and I’ve felt both directionless and demotivated at times, and extremely excited about the future at others.

Firstly, the issues with the company have made me reassess what I am doing career-wise. I think I’ve mentally checked out of the company, and although I have half-heartedly applied for new jobs, it’s only a matter of time before I do so properly. I just feel there is no point in working hard for a company that is on the brink and is being run so irresponsibly. The atmosphere in the company has become rather unstable and certain individuals are attempting a power grab (the chairman’s son-in-law). As he is a deeply unpleasant man and is unlikely to be going anywhere, it only leaves me with one choice long term. In the meantime, I will keep working and collecting the dough.

Secondly, a visit by some antipodean friends of my girlfriend gave me some great ideas. They had given up their jobs and were planning on travelling round Europe in a camper van. It will be 3-4 months of adventure and fun. Although they were not officially doing ‘FIRE’ they were certainly far more financially free than me. It goes to show that at age 28 and 26, with careful saving, they were able to undertake this great adventure. They don’t do very high paid jobs but decided this was a goal and lived a lifestyle that would allow them to reach the goal. They lived in a shared house in Melbourne and didn’t eat out much. Now they have enough money to give up work, buy a camper van and live carefree for a bit. Well done them.

The great idea was the result of a side hustle that my friend had where he ran a website and provided services to contractors making £16,000 in the process. I realised that I could do exactly the same thing with my skills albeit, providing a different service. So I plan to set up a company of sorts and do it part-time. Should it take off, I would do it full time. Watch this space…

Debt progress

I have been paying off my debts steadily. I have to confess that I didn’t mention a £700 credit card bill that I let sit since February in any of my previous posts (mainly because I was ignoring its existence). So that was disappointing, but it was there and is now paid. I also paid £300 to my other loan which got me below the £3000 mark. This was a huge achievement and the end really is in sight.

I feel like I am 2-3 months away from clearing my debt. This is slightly longer than I had anticipated but I have felt the need to splurge a bit this month. A trip to Bath for the weekend, eating out a fair bit, and a trip to Scotland to visit my mother have eaten into my balance. However, they were all needed and enjoyable. I didn’t use a credit card to pay for any of them and I still have money in my account at the end of the month AND I paid £1000 of debt off. Not bad.

I do feel I will have to reign it in a bit this month however and really get to the end of the debt, but overall I feel that my finances are under far greater control than they ever were before.

OSV18_01_PowerStation_Hero.0.jpg
Dream campervan

 

 

 

Some anxiety

anxiety.jpg

The past three weeks have been rather difficult for me. Despite my genuine excitement at being able to ‘see the light at the end of the tunnel’ for my debts, some external forces have upset this happy FIRE ship.

On Tuesday shortly before Easter, when I arrived at my company’s office, there was a bouncer on the door and a notice saying we could not go in. Rather perturbed, myself, the Chairman and other employees didn’t really know what was going on.

I work for a small consultancy business with big ambitions, and one that has taken some big risks. Apparently, historic projects had lost some money and the company had not paid the rent in a misguided attempt to juggle cash flow. Big mistake; the landlord had kicked us out.

After several days of working from home, we were allowed back in at greatly unfavourable terms and I believe the company had to pay rent in advance.

Clearly, this caused a great deal of anxiety and stress for myself and everyone else. The kind of thoughts running through everyone’s head were did the company have enough money to pay bills? Would we be paid? Was the company going bust? They assured us it would be fine. I wasn’t convinced.

I am delighted to say that I got paid on the 30 April and I am feeling a bit better about it all. I may still look elsewhere for a job, but as I have just won my first new client, I am reluctant to pack in all that hard work. I left the security of big corporates to experience risk and reward and while I never expected to hit these lows, it is not always going to be plain sailing.

This remains an ongoing saga.

The fall out

What does this mean for my journey to financial independence? The answer to that question is threefold.

Firstly, It has somewhat knocked my confidence in what I am doing. The aggressive approach to paying off my debts effectively is pushing me to my limit. By the end of the month, I had £5 left in my account. I am refusing to spend on a credit card or take an overdraft. I made it to the end without breaking or missing any bills, but it didn’t feel great. I desperately needed the paycheck to stay afloat.

Secondly, I knew that using all my savings to pay off my debts was risky as it left no room for manoeuvre. I only have £200 in my savings which is not very much at all. I was feeling good as I was making such fine progress in paying off my debts, but it is a stark reminder to leave enough for emergencies. I had thought about this and reasoned that if something bad happened, I could use my credit card. However, my mentality has changed so much since starting FIRE that the thought of adding to my credit card and undoing the good work so far almost made me feel ill.  Perhaps leaving a months salary in the bank may have been smarter and letting the process take a couple months longer might have been a better move.

Thirdly, and most importantly, the whole episode has made me more determined to succeed at FIRE. The timing of this event was particularly bad as I have taken a big risk to clear debt leaving me with no reserves, but if this happened in 12 months time, I would have a large cushion of savings and investments on which to fall back. That thought alone is motivation for me to keep going. It is the quintessential reason that I am doing this so that I don’t need to rely on my job and other people who may be inept at running a business, for my livelihood.

To conclude, it seems that in taking a risk to clear my debts, I’ve accidentally put myself in the exact position that FIRE aims to get me out of. I always viewed this phase as the most painful part of gaining FI and it has been more painful than expected for reasons both within and outside of my control. I will persevere, but perhaps with more caution until I have a significant buffer behind me.